Keeping Up With Changing Immigration And Asylum Policies

The laws surrounding asylum and immigration are constantly changing. Laws, policies, regulations or executive orders passed can be challenged in the court system, meaning it is important to work with an attorney who can keep up. Often, the difference between an approved application and a denied one depends upon the preparation and presentation of your application.

At the Law Offices of Santiago & Associates, P.C., we understand how confusing and stressful the immigration process can be. We keep tabs on changing immigration laws to ensure that our clients have the most current information. We take the time to assist you in preparing the application and supporting documentation to provide you the best opportunity of getting an approval.

The Basics Of DACA

DACA stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. This program allowed young people who were brought illegally to the country the opportunity to work, go to school and get driver's licenses while having temporary protection from deportation or removal.

If someone could prove they had come to the U.S. before they turned 16 and had lived here continuously since June 15, 2007, they were eligible for the program. DACA has been the subject of many lawsuits since it was created, causing much uncertainty for those who rely on it to stay in the country.

If you have questions about the current status of DACA and other similar programs, get in touch with a skilled immigration lawyer as soon as possible.

Applying For Asylum

Asylum is meant to provide protection for those who are fleeing persecution in their home country due to their race, religion, nationality, political ties or membership in a particular social group . The application, known as a Form I-589, must be filed within one year of arriving in the U.S. and can include spouses and children.

Applying for asylum is different from applying for a work visa or green card. You can legally work as soon as asylum is granted and can apply for permanent resident one year later.

What You Need To Know About Temporary Protected Status (TPS)

TPS was created in the 1990s to protect foreign nationals whose home countries were unsafe due to ongoing armed conflict, environmental disaster or other extraordinary circumstances.

It typically gave people 18 months of safety from deportation and could be renewed based upon the United States Attorney General re-designation of TPS for each country. If a person's TPS protection is revoked or they are no longer eligible due to residency or committing acts of violence, crimes or threats to national security, they need to obtain legal residency status or risk being deported or removed from the United States.

We Are Here To Help

We gladly offer initial consultations at our offices in Freehold, New Jersey, where we will discuss the details of your individual case with you. To make an appointment, call 732-410-7138 or send us an email.